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xnaFan's Blog » 2010 » December

Archive for December, 2010

Empty folder deleter – cleanup tool

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Since I often download pdfs, sourcecode and other files from the web, I often end up with my downloads folder being cluttered with full and empty folders between each other.

emptyfolderdeleter_screenshot

For that reason I made a little commandline tool to delete empty folders. I have it in my downloads folder, so I can doubleclick it whenever I’ve been sorting stuff, and want the empty folders deleted. To be sure that you meant to run the program it asks you to press D(elete) on the keyboard to continue. You can run it from a batch file with the parameter "-quiet" to make it run without confirmation.
You can download the application CommandPrompt (zip), or the source code floppy .

An interesting code snippet is the Options class. Earlier I've been using Plossum, but I didn't want to include referenced DLLs in my app, so I made the Options class as an alternative. It is a class which parses the command line and stores the options in public properties, so the logic in the command line version could easily be changed to accept input from for example an xml file. The main logic is in the constructor which receives the string[] sent from the Main() method of the program.cs.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;

namespace EmptyFolderDeleter
{

// ****************************************************************
// Jakob Krarup - December 2010
// http://www.xnafan.net
// Distributed under Creative Commons Attribution license:
// http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
// Short version: use it how you wish, just leave my name on it :)
// ****************************************************************

///

/// Class to parse commandline options for the EmptyFolderDeleter program
///

public class Options
{

#region Properties

///

/// The folder to delete files in
///

public string Folder { get; set; }

///

/// Whether to refrain from writing status to the console
///

public bool Quiet { get; set; }

///

/// Whether to display the program help for the user
///

public bool Help { get; set; }

///

/// Whether there was an error parsing the arguments in the constructor
///

public bool ParseError { get; set; }

///

/// What the error was, when parsing the arguments in the constructor
///

public string ParseErrorMessage { get; set; }

#endregion

///

/// Parses the commandline arguments and saves them in an Options object
///

/// A string[] containing the arguments /// An Options object containing the parsed values
public Options(string[] args)
{
if (args.Length == 0)
{
return;
}
else
{
//convert the argument array to list to be able to use LINQ and to remove items
List argList = args.ToList();

//create a stringbuilder for the errormessages
StringBuilder error = new StringBuilder();

try
{
//if "help" is one of the arguments, set the help property of options to true
if (argList.Any(arg => arg.ToLower() == "-help"))
{
this.Help = true;
argList.Remove("-help");
}

//if "help" is one of the arguments, set the help property of options to true
if (argList.Any(arg => arg.ToLower() == "/?"))
{
this.Help = true;
argList.Remove("/?");
}

//if "quiet" is one of the arguments, set the verbose property to false
this.Quiet = argList.Any(arg => arg.ToLower() == "-quiet");
argList.Remove("-quiet");

if (argList.Any(arg => arg.StartsWith("-path")))
{
//find the first argument that begins with "-path"
string folderArgument = argList.First(arg => arg.StartsWith("-path"));

string folderPath = folderArgument.Split('=')[1].Trim();
//remove quotationmarks
this.Folder = folderPath.Replace("\"", "");
if (!Directory.Exists(this.Folder))
{
this.ParseError = true;
error.Append("The path '" + this.Folder + "' is not a valid folder.\r\n");
}
argList.Remove(folderArgument);
}

//if there are still arguments left, the user has entered an invalid argument
if (argList.Count > 0)
{
this.ParseError = true;
argList.ForEach(arg => error.Append("Unknown argument: '" + arg + "'.\r\n"));

}

}
catch (Exception ex)
{
this.ParseError = true;
error.Append("Error while trying to parse arguments.\r\n The error message is '" + ex.Message + "'.");
}
//save the collected errormessages
this.ParseErrorMessage = error.ToString();

}
}

///

/// The folder the user wants to delete, as a DirectoryInfo
///

/// The folder the user wants to delete, as a DirectoryInfo
public DirectoryInfo GetFolder()
{
DirectoryInfo folderDir = null;

//if no parameter was given or ".", then we use the current folder
if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(Folder) || Folder == ".")
{
folderDir = new FileInfo(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location).Directory;
}

else if (!Directory.Exists(Folder))
{
//if a folder parameter was given, but it doesn't exist, we throw an exception
throw new ArgumentException("The path '" + folderDir + "'is not a valid folder");
}
else
{
folderDir = new DirectoryInfo(this.Folder);
}

return folderDir;
}
}
}

MineCraft Timer app for Netduino

Monday, December 27th, 2010

MinecraftSince my previous post two things have happened...
First I’ve taken a liking to MineCraft, the builder/explorer indiegame that sold over half a million copies.   Secondly – I’ve taken up learning electronics, using Electronics for Dummies, and YouTube ;-).

When I try to learn something new, I always start out with a little project I really want to do. It gives a lot of motivation to get through the ordeal of learning something by yourself.
For a long time, I’ve wanted to be able to program something on the PC which interacts with homemade netduinohardware outside the PC. I had heard about the Arduino (an open source programmable micro computer which interfaces with homemade periferals), but hadn’t gotten so far as to invest in one, when I heard about the netduino. The netduino is an Arduino for .Net coders. It runs the .Net Micro Framework, so you can write code in C# in Visual Studio.Net and then deploy it directly to the USB connected netduino.

minecraft_canary Ever since I downloaded the MineCraft Canary for my Android, which lets me know what time of day it is on the surface, I wanted to make an electronic version using LEDs. I am not yet skilled enough to make a version using just electronic components from scratch (you know – the oldfashioned way with soldering and stuff), so I thought “Why not use the netduino?” :).

After quite a bit of fiddling around, and learning that the .Net Micro Framework doesn’t have Linq, Generics, and a host of other things I take for granted these days – I got a little working solution running.

In the video here I demonstrate the concept, both using the netduino’s built-in LED and button, and using the Seeed Studio Electronic Brick Starter Kit, which adds the possibility of click-on extensions.

There are two sets of code here:

- the really simple, written in one Program.cs file, which only uses the netduino boards button and LED
- a more advanced one which supports any number of inputs and notification components in a class hierarchy which implements interfaces for a code-your-own-extension style app.
They are both available for download here floppy

If you have the Electronic Brick Starter Kit, you need the ?LiquidCrystal library for interfacing with the LCD display.

The netduino is a LOT of fun :).

------------------------

UPDATE 28 December 2010

Yay - my favorite webzine (MakeZine.com) found my project and posted it :D

http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2010/12/minecraft_timer_app_for_netduino.html

EPIC WIN!!!1 :)

And Kotaku as well - yay! http://kotaku.com/5720244/make-your-own-minecraft-alarm-clock